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Floral Polonaise – 1770s

Gallery of English Costume, 1770s - 80s style of dresses, Janet Arnold costumes, replica historical costumes by HandBound, polonaise dresses from the 18thc, where can I get a period dress made up, replica costume maker , corsetier specialising in 18thc stays, HandBound Historical Costumes

Floral Polonaise – 1770s

£270.00

Details:

– 100% Cotton Fabrics and Lining
– Based on Original – 1770-80s
– CF Closure with Hook and Eyes
– Hand finished Sleeves
– Pockets Openings at Sides
– DRESS only – Quilted Petticoat NOT included

Out of stock

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Product Description

The Floral Anglais

c.1770s

A simple but stunning floral cotton Day dress (or ‘Undress’ for the Georgian lot in our midst). This dress has been based on an original pattern from a dress in the Gallery of English Costume and has been made up using a back log of research studying dresses of this kind in the various museums. It is ‘Made to Measure’ which means that it gets made up to your own size and designed to fit you personally. Please note, we only have about 3 dresses worth of fabric left!

* Also IMPORTANT INFO: – this dress does not include the Quilted Petticoat that it has been featured with – please click here for more info! *

So, lets talk Features:

– This dress has been fully lined. Not that many of the originals were, but their beautiful, original cottons were of a much firmer nature than the soft, printed cottons we can get now-a-days. Lining it fully and having that lining mounted onto the cottons has helped recreate that weight. It has been made with 100% cotton floral fabric and a 100% cotton lining.

– It has the classic back pleats that stretch elegantly down into the skirts and is the key feature that mark this as an ‘Anglais’ or ‘English gown’. It’s CF meeting bodice is also classic of this style of dress that came into fashion in the last quarter of the 18th c and although CF closing gowns could be seen prior to this they tend to be the exception. This style burst onto the scene in the 70s and our museums are full of them. Interestingly enough the majority of the ones we’ve actually handled don’t tend to show any form of fastening – most only with a delicate cotton cord coming our from the neckline that was used to draw it in around the bosom so that it did not gape. This lack of fastenings (that and the pin holes!) is the evidence left from a culture of pinning or sewing oneself into a gown. The original of this little lady actually had hook and eyes and we have replicated that feature but please feel free to request a sew in/pin in option. This will reduce the price a little. (Smiley face!)

– The design characteristics of this period dress is the wide sweeping decolletage and your stays will need to be of this period and emmulating this sweeping neckline to be able to not be visible. In her novel ‘The Sylph’ Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire has a character complain of the wideness of her stays and how they hurt her arm!

– Growing up in Stays seems to have given the Georgians a neat, elegant short’ Cross Back’. This is the measurement that goes across the back and it’s wonderful to see the pattern with such an incredibly wide front and a diddy little back. A real eye opener into 18th century pattern cuttinGallery of English Costume, 1770s - 80s style of dresses, Janet Arnold costumes, replica historical costumes by HandBound, polonaise dresses from the 18thc, where can I get a period dress made up, replica costume maker , corsetier specialising in 18thc stays, HandBound Historical Costumesg. It took a while to get our heads around that one!

– The whole dress has been mounted onto the bodice lining, as in the original, and the pleats of the gown sewn onto this by hand. The hem, then, of the floral Bodice has then been hand sewn down over these pleats.

– The pleats gathering at the side, hide a pocket opening which has been machine stitched – as has the long running seams of the skirts and bodice.

– The sleeves have been put in using original techniques – where the underarm gets sewn as we would now-a-days but then the crown, with it’s pleating gets folded over the top and hidden by the shoulder strap fabric. We’d love to be able to ask a dressmaker of this period why they did it this way as they used the ‘Setting in a Sleeve’ method for the men’s coats so why not for dresses? Perhaps it has something to do with the years of Robings where there was no shoulder fabric used – just the lining and the robings folded down afterwards – who knows, but it is rather interesting.

– The Sleeves have been bound and lined.

This dress can be dressed up or dressed down depending on the class you are copying. We have dressed it with a silk quilted petticoat which would be classy day wear for any lady of leisure but equally the Quilted Petticoat, which is reversible, can get turned through and voila – a linen version. Or, it can be worn with a plain linen or woolen petticoat to bring it down another layer of social standing. Or really get committed and you can distress it and wear it as a second hand, well handed down and dug out from some flea market poorer option. The choices are yours!